Avoid a Halloween Nightmare: Don’t Drink and Drive
 
By Illinois Department of Transportation
October 26, 2017
 

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Transportation, Illinois State Police and local law enforcement agencies across the state are reminding motorists to Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over this Halloween to prevent a nightmare caused by impaired driving.

“Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol is a potentially deadly crime that could land you in jail for a long time,” said Priscilla Tobias, director of IDOT’s Office of Program Development. “Skip the scare: Make a plan for how you’ll get home before heading out to Halloween festivities. Let’s treat ourselves to zero fatalities on Illinois roads this Halloween.”

Law enforcement is stepping up patrols starting Friday, Oct. 27, through the early morning hours of Nov. 1 to help keep roads safe through Halloween. The enforcement effort takes place as the number of traffic fatalities continues to keep pace with 2016, the deadliest year on Illinois roads since 2007.

“Children who are trick-or-treating tend to dart out unexpectedly into the roadways. The Illinois State Police is asking drivers to be more careful and to watch for children not paying attention to traffic,” said Illinois State Police Director Leo P. Schmitz. “For the safety of our communities, the ISP will focus on the Fatal Four violations, the most common causes of fatal traffic crashes: DUI, speeding, occupant restraint and distracted driving. Watch your speed, buckle up, keep your eyes on the road, and if alcohol is involved with your Halloween events, designate a driver.”

If you’ll be drinking alcohol this Halloween, make a plan beforehand and follow these tips to ensure that you – and others – get home safely:

• Designate a sober driver, call a cab, use a ride-sharing service, take mass transit or call a sober friend or family member to get home safely.
• Use your community’s designated driver program, if available.
• If you see an impaired driver, pull over and dial 911 immediately.
• If you see an impaired person about to drive, take their keys and help them get home safely.
• Make sure everyone in your vehicle wears their seat belt and children are safely secured in an appropriate car seat or booster seat.

This law enforcement effort is made possible by federal highway safety funds administered by the Illinois Department of Transportation.

 
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